Large Practices Lead The Trend In EHR Adoption, Study Finds

According to a study report by Commonwealth Fund, adoption of electronic health record systems (EHRs) has increased significantly from 2009 to 2012. The study also finds that larger organizations have reported higher adoption rate than smaller settings. Also, there has been a considerable lag in interoperability between providers’ systems and patients.

https://i1.wp.com/pw-cdn.poweryourpractice.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/what-patients-like-about-EHRs.jpgBetween 2009 and 2012, the EHR adoption rate jumped from 46% to 69%, as did their use of certain health IT functions such as electronic prescription transmissions to pharmacies, 34% to 66%; and electronic lab ordering, 38% to 54%.

Also see: Patients Still Not Fully Informed About EHRs

But the report also highlighted that only half of physicians in solo practices were using EHRs in 2012 vs. 90% of docs in groups of 20 or more. Also in 2012, just 1 in 3 primary-care physicians could swap clinical summaries with a physician colleague and only 35% could share lab results outside their practices. [@HealthITplus]

Further, only 33% or lesser physicians allowed patients to view their test results, make appointments or ask for Rx refills electronically, pointing towards a wide gap in interoperability between patients and providers.

The study report, published in the February issue of Health Services Journal, a synopsis of which is posted online at the Commonwealth Fund website, was based on surveys conducted by the Commonwealth Fund in 2009 (of 1,012 primary-care physicians) and 2012 (1,442 primary-care physicians).

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