Growth Areas And Changes To Watch For In The Health IT Market In 2014

According to a new Research and Markets’ report entitled: North American Healthcare IT Market Report 2013-2017, the health IT market of North America is going to grow at a compound rate of 7.4 percent to reach $31.3 billion by 2017 from $21.9 billion in 2012. https://i2.wp.com/cdn2.hubspot.net/hub/215468/file-397288998-png/Blog_Images/north_american_health_it_growth.pngThe main factors driving this growth include higher demand for clinical information technology, and administrative solutions and services.

The report segments the market on the basis of applications, delivery modes, and components. Based on application, the North American healthcare information technology is segmented into provider (clinical information technology and non-clinical information technology) and payer, while the market by delivery mode is further categorized as on-premises, Web-based, and cloud-based. The healthcare information technology by component is made up of hardware, software and services. [@HealthITplus] Continue reading

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Top 5 Issues Facing Doctors In 2014

The Physician Foundation released its Physicians Watch List highlighting the five biggest issues facing doctors in 2014. Here’s brief information about the list:

  1. Consolidation leading to monopolization. Consolidation concerns made last year’s list, but this year, those worries about more and more doctors joining larger and larger health systems have morphed into anxiety about eroding competition.
  2. Continuing growth of regulatory burdens. Nonclinical paperwork already takes up a lot of physicians’ time, but with the deadline for ICD-10 implementation looming, even more time for administrative paperwork will be required of doctors.
  3. Confusion. Many private practice physicians have not been educated on how the new health insurance exchanges work and so are unsure how to explain them to their patients. Their own lack of understanding has led them to be worried about whether their reimbursement rates will be less in the exchanges; whether they will be able to control the number of exchange-based patients they will have to take on; and the potential difficulties of collecting out-of-pocket charges from these patients.
  4. Health information technology. Doctors are frustrated by the lack of interoperability between electronic health systems and are worried about how HIT will impact how they practice and protecting the privacy and security of patient information.
  5. Stalemates. Doctors, too, are frustrated by the seeming inability of Congress to operate. Particular worries associated with lawmaker decisions include the continued struggle to repeal the sustainable growth rate and what will happen if the 24 percent cut scheduled for the start of 2014 is triggered; ongoing deadlock on tort reform; and worries about the fate of Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements in federal budget talks.

Source: Healthcare Finance News

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Hospitals Are Set For Meaningful Use Stage 2 Now [REPORT]

More than 60 percent hospitals are prepared to take on Meaningful Use Stage 2, according to new HIMSS Analytics [twitter.com/HealthITplus]

https://i0.wp.com/www.ehealthdc.org/wp-content/uploads/1_Meaningful-Use_Arrow.jpgA new report released on Sept 18 from HIMSS Analytics, Hospital Readiness to Meet Meaningful Use Stage 2, reveals that over 60 percent of eligible hospitals have acquired the requirements for meaningful use stage 2. The report assesses the preparedness of eligible hospitals and their electronic health records that are used to store all patient information.

The highlights of the report include:

  • At least 60 percent of hospitals in the sample have met the requirements for at least nine of the core metrics that define Stage 2 meaningful use; and
  • Some 70 percent of respondents across all metrics are actively moving toward meeting Stage 2 meaningful use requirements.

Continue reading

EHRs and Meaningful Use Transforming Patient Care

Since 2011, more than 4.6 million patients have received an electronic copy of their health information from their EHR, according to CMS.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released a data stating that an increasing amount of healthcare providers are using electronic health records (EHR) to improve their patients’ care and provide more information to their patients regarding their health.

The data also reveals that more than 50 percent of eligible healthcare professionals and more than 80 percent of eligible hospitals in U.S. have received meaningful use incentives since the program’s inception. Using EHRs, physicians and care providers have been able to provide improved patient care to millions and also boosted their efficiencies and productivity.

Farzad Mostashari, MD and National Coordinator highlighting the benefits and achievements of the program said, “More patients than ever before are seeing the benefits of their providers using electronic health records to help better coordinate and manage their care. These data show that health care professionals are not only adopting electronic health records rapidly, they’re also using them to improve care.” Continue reading

Physicians Continue say Yes to EHR Adoption

According to a recent report submitted to the Congress, an ever increasing amount of physicians are embracing (and agreeing to adopt) electronic health records (EHRs) into workplaces. Along with EHRs, physicians are also looking for newer, more sophisticated ways to interact and stay connected with their patients even when they are away from their workplaces.

https://i2.wp.com/healthcareittoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/meaningful-use-101.gifCompared to only 48 percent in 2009, in 2012, more than 72 percent of physicians used electronic health records and the count seems to be growing rapidly. Physicians are going forward and demanding increased EHR functionality, with 80 percent having EHRs with computerized provider order entry for medication orders in 2012, compared to 65 percent in 2011, and 67 percent having EHRs with drug interaction checks, compared to 51 percent in 2011. Continue reading