Upcoming 2014 mHealth Events

There have been a lot of technological innovations and enhancements surrounding the mobile health (mHealth). Mobile health is considered the future of patient-centric care. One of the main factors contributing towards the growth of mobile health is consumerism. Today, consumers are becoming more tech savvy using their mobiles for a variety of stuff, every day. Smartphones and apps for healthcare are changing the way people are living and using apps to participate in healthcare.

mHealth Summit

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The e-patient movement is the next big thing in the healthcare industry. Consumers are using multiple devices such as smartphones, tablets, wearable and connected gadgets such as watches, sensors etc. and are seeking new ways to integrate digital health into their day-to-day activities. Mobile sensors are taking more place within the industry. InMedica predicts that the American telehealth market will grow by 600 percent between 2012 and 2017. This would represent an increase from the current 227,000 telehealth patients to reach up to 1.3m patients in 2017. They think this is mostly related to the reimbursement changes in the US. [@HealthITplus] Continue reading

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Top 5 Issues Facing Doctors In 2014

The Physician Foundation released its Physicians Watch List highlighting the five biggest issues facing doctors in 2014. Here’s brief information about the list:

  1. Consolidation leading to monopolization. Consolidation concerns made last year’s list, but this year, those worries about more and more doctors joining larger and larger health systems have morphed into anxiety about eroding competition.
  2. Continuing growth of regulatory burdens. Nonclinical paperwork already takes up a lot of physicians’ time, but with the deadline for ICD-10 implementation looming, even more time for administrative paperwork will be required of doctors.
  3. Confusion. Many private practice physicians have not been educated on how the new health insurance exchanges work and so are unsure how to explain them to their patients. Their own lack of understanding has led them to be worried about whether their reimbursement rates will be less in the exchanges; whether they will be able to control the number of exchange-based patients they will have to take on; and the potential difficulties of collecting out-of-pocket charges from these patients.
  4. Health information technology. Doctors are frustrated by the lack of interoperability between electronic health systems and are worried about how HIT will impact how they practice and protecting the privacy and security of patient information.
  5. Stalemates. Doctors, too, are frustrated by the seeming inability of Congress to operate. Particular worries associated with lawmaker decisions include the continued struggle to repeal the sustainable growth rate and what will happen if the 24 percent cut scheduled for the start of 2014 is triggered; ongoing deadlock on tort reform; and worries about the fate of Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements in federal budget talks.

Source: Healthcare Finance News

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Patient-Centered Care Biggest Agent Driving Mobile Adoption – Excerpts From mHealth Summit 2013

According to an expert panel consisting of senior executives from top healthcare organizations at the mHealth Summit 2013 in Washington D.C., mobile technology may very well be the future of patient-centric care. However, there is a strong need for better evidences to take it to the next level of adoption and implementation.

Cleveland Clinic Chief Medical Information Officer David Levin said, “We imagine things that will actually change people’s behavior, but we’re often wrong. Harping that health IT is not usually designed with the patient in mind. “Good design takes into account human factors and what motivates people and [what integrates] into and IT ecosystem,” he said.

Consumerism is adding to success of mHealth so far and it’s going to significantly change the way people live. mHealth patients won’t accept not getting their health data and not using mobile health apps to keep track of and participate in their own healthcare. [twitter.com/HealthITplus] Continue reading

HealthIT Transition, How it Happened [Infographic]

In 2009, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, a part of the Recovery Act, created the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Programs to promote the adoption of EHRs in support of the ultimate goals of improving the quality of patient care and reducing health costs. Through this program, eligible hospitals and doctors earn incentives by demonstrating “meaningful use” of certified technology, which means that health care providers use EHRs in ways that improve care and lower costs. Examples of “meaningful use” include electronic prescribing of medications and ensuring patients have access to their digital records.

 The following infographic created by the ONC illustrates the progress made in the nation’s transition to health IT since the passage of the HITECH Act in 2009. [twitter.com/healthitplus]

Hospitals Are Set For Meaningful Use Stage 2 Now [REPORT]

More than 60 percent hospitals are prepared to take on Meaningful Use Stage 2, according to new HIMSS Analytics [twitter.com/HealthITplus]

https://i0.wp.com/www.ehealthdc.org/wp-content/uploads/1_Meaningful-Use_Arrow.jpgA new report released on Sept 18 from HIMSS Analytics, Hospital Readiness to Meet Meaningful Use Stage 2, reveals that over 60 percent of eligible hospitals have acquired the requirements for meaningful use stage 2. The report assesses the preparedness of eligible hospitals and their electronic health records that are used to store all patient information.

The highlights of the report include:

  • At least 60 percent of hospitals in the sample have met the requirements for at least nine of the core metrics that define Stage 2 meaningful use; and
  • Some 70 percent of respondents across all metrics are actively moving toward meeting Stage 2 meaningful use requirements.

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The Missing Link Between Meaningful Use And Health IT Innovation

Deadlines can never bring forth innovation. When everything is under the MU pressure, the need to meet Federal Mandates overshadows everything else. This results in loopholes, and in many cases, leads to bad engineering. [twitter.com/healthitplus]

https://i2.wp.com/www.medicaldatamanagementgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Picture-13.pngMany a times, EMRs are produced to meet the MU requirements but doesn’t meet the needs of the consumers. As a result, MU is failing to create the environment it is attempting to create through the stringent regulations and deadlines.

Yes, Meaningful Use has supported innovation in ways such as:

  • The Blue Button Plus supports a new, higher level of patient access to their data,and is built from components and requirements already present in Stage 2.
  • The Query Health initiative has done innovative work that supports not only its stated focus (health research) but also automation of quality measurement using HL7′s HQMF.

But eventually the Meaningful Use will stress on EMR developers to come up to the MU standards but not innovation. So, maybe we will see a gradual rise in applications that provide a different set of functionalities to EMRs.

Readers, what innovations would you like to see?

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KMG HealthIT+ Newsletter – September Issue

1. Health IT Spending to Cross $34.5 Billion in 2014

2. Why it’s Crucial for Providers to Invest in mHealth

3. Physicians Embrace Smartphones and Tablets, Become Digital Omnivores

4. Building Patient Compliance through mHealth

Read more stories: http://bit.ly/18vlaIL

 

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Health IT Spending to Cross $34.5 Billion in 2014

The current regulatory trends are driving the North American healthcare IT industry to cross USD 34.5 billion in 2014, a new study by Technology Business Research Inc (TBR) suggests. The growth in industry is expected to open up many opportunities for new vendors.

TBR reported that the money will be strewn across industry applications, business applications, productivity applications, business intelligence and analytics, database and technology, and systems management. The report also stated that vendors who are currently holding a good position have high chances of securing their dominance over the market.

Health IT Spending in 2014

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Healthcare IT Outsourcing Demands Are On The Rise

With rapid increase in the overall healthcare industry, the healthcare IT outsourcing segment is also witnessing continued growth and is forecasted to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 7.6 percent, to reach $50.4 billion by 2018 from $35 billion in 2013. The results were published through a new market research conducted by RnR.https://i1.wp.com/triplehelixblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/medical-tourism-1.jpeg

The main segments driving the healthcare IT outsourcing market are health insurance, healthcare systems, and pharmaceuticals. According to the report, the outsourcing market model is enabling these segments to focus on core business, reduce operational and maintenance costs, increase access to IT skilled and quickly implement new technologies and train staff. Continue reading

5 Health IT impact points on Consolidation

Providers can focus more on patients when technology becomes more invisible…..and seamless

https://i1.wp.com/www.column5.com/sites/default/files/images/generic/Column5-BPC.pngA majority of health it professionals are trying to keep up with the latest technological advancements in the healthcare industry. They seem to be more stressing on implementing and maintaining health systems than keeping track of larger healthcare trends driving the industry e.g. the pace at which hospital practices are being purchased and sold.

The fact however is that health IT is a major factor in the decision-making of healthcare administrators, affecting the overall consolidation process.

Greg Chittim, Director of Analytics and Performance at Arcadia Solutions, has listen down five major areas where IT concerns factor into the drive toward, and the success of, consolidation. Continue reading